James K. Polk vs Henry Clay

James K. Polk’s profile picture
Henry Clay’s profile picture
Political Leader
Net worth 2018
Political Leaders
Industry
Political Leaders
Pineville
Residence
Hanover County, Virginia, United States
United States
Country
United States
02/11/1795
BirthDay
12/04/1777
June 15, 1849
Died On
June 29, 1852
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Education
College of William & Mary
NET WORTH STATISTIC
TIMELINE
2009

His image was imprinted on Presidential $1 Coin Program coin, which was released on February 7, 2009

1995

The United States Postal Service, issued several stamps to honor Polk, the latest was released in 1995 on Polk’s 200th birth anniversary

1949

As per which the Oregon was divided along the 49th parallel between the two nations

1849

His term as President of the United States ended on March 4, 1849 and as promised he did not run for the second term

1848

After several bloody battles in 1848, Mexico surrendered and signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which was ratified by Polk

1846

Amidst growing tensions with Mexico, Polk in his submission to Congress on May 11, 1846, asked for their support to invade Mexico, which he received from overwhelming majority of senators

1845

On March 4, 1845, at the age of 49, he became the youngest American President of that time

1844

In the 1844 presidential elections, Polk was counted as the frontrunner for the post of Vice President on the Democratic ticket, whereas Martin Van Buren was being eyed as their presidential candidate

1839

He left the Congress in 1839, to take up the post of governor of Tennessee

1825

In 1825, Polk successfully ran for the United States House of Representatives and served as the speaker of the House from 1835 till 1839

1823

His career in politics began, when he became a member to the Tennessee legislature in 1823, where he came in close contact with Andrew Jackson

1820

In 1820, he was accepted by the bar and had a successful practice, as debt related litigations had increased phenomenally after the Panic of 1819

1816

Later in 1816, he once again changed institutes and migrated to the University of North Carolina, from where he graduated with honors in 1818

1813

He took admission at the Zion Church close to his home, in July 1813 and a year later transferred to Murfreesboro, where he shined brilliantly as a student

1812

In 1812, he had to go under the knife in order to get his urinary stones removed

1870

Between 1870 and 1908, Clay had appeared on different denomination of postage stamps issued by the US Postal Service

1850

The bill he drafted has since been known as ‘Compromise of 1850’

1849

However, the retirement was short lived and Clay returned to the Senate in 1849

1848

In 1848, he did not get the nomination and decided to retire

1844

In 1844, Clay was nominated by the Whigs to stand for the post of the President; but this time too he failed to win the election because of the opponent’s populist policies

1833

While the first and the last were aimed at maintaining the integrity of the nation the ‘Tariff of 1833’ tried to secure its economic development

1832

In 1832, Clay contested for the office of the President once again, but lost

1831

In 1831, Clay was elected to the Senate and very soon it became his political home

1828

South Carolina had refused to pay the high tariff imposed by the federal government in 1828 and threatened to secede

1825

However, he became the Secretary of the State in 1825 in the administration of President John Quincy Adams and remained in the post till 1829

1823

Clay was selected as the Speaker for the House of Representatives for the third time in 1823

1820

”The Missouri Compromise of 1820’, the ‘Compromise Tariff of 1833’, and the ‘Compromise of 1850’ are three most important works in the life of Henry Clay

1816

In 1816, Clay helped to establish the American Colonizing Society and became its President

1815

In 1815, Clay was reelected as the Speaker of the House of Representatives and remained so until the end of the term in 1821

1814

In 1814, Clay was chosen as a member of the peace delegation at Ghent, Bulgaria

1812

He was instrumental to the signing of the treaty that ended the War of 1812

1811

In 1811, Henry Clay was elected to the House of Representatives and was chosen as the Speaker of the House

1810

In 1810, Clay was sent to the Senate for a second time

1809

On January 3, 1809, he introduced a resolution that required the members to come in homespun suits

1807

However, the term ended within three months and he went back to Kentucky in the beginning of 1807

1806

In 1806, while Clay was still legally underage, he was sent to the Senate by Kentucky legislative assembly to fill up the seat vacated by John Breckinridge

1804

From 1804 onwards, Henry started buying plantation land and called it Ashland

1803

In 1803, he became the representative of Fayette County in the Kentucky General Assembly

1799

Henry Clay married Lucretia Hart on April 11 1799, within two years of starting his legal career

1797

In November 1797, Clay moved to Lexington, which was at that time a growing town in the state of Kentucky

1781

He lost his father in 1781, when he was barely four years old

1777

Henry Clay was born on April 12, 1777 to Reverend John and Elizabeth Clay in a plantation in Hanovar County in Virginia